Hobbit Stew on Friday the 13th

 

Hobbit

Preparing to stand in a long, early morning, Hobbit ish line.

 

 

We won’t deceive, there are a fair number of rabid Tolkien enthusiasts among the HRV staff.  As such, we embark on today’s Hobbit round 2 premier with great anticipation and some sidelong glances from those who have had to listen to Gandalf Groupies chatter in excitement over this next installment in the series.  Gone are the dark days between 2007 and 2012 when nary a Middle Earth premier lay on the horizon and we Tolkienites were relegated to viewing the extended editions of the first three movies marathon style in every possible combination of director’s cut and commentary.  It is with great hope and anticipation that we fantastical few don our wooden swords and elvish ears to travel the twists and turns of Desolation’s release.  (more…)


New Wildlife Photos

Wildlife - Halter Ranch Vineyard

That is indeed an elk.

 

An aspect of our sustainable program are the wildlife corridors kept intact by installing an extra 16000 feet of fencing when the vineyard was planted.  The corridors allow deer and other fauna to get through the vineyard to 1300 acres of oak and wildlife preserve that remain undisturbed but for the occasional exploratory trip from our staff to insure no humans are occupying the back portion of the property for sinister purpose.  Recently Lucas Pope installed wildlife cameras at 2 watering holes within the preserve.  Included here just three out of 350 photos taken by one of the two cameras over the past 6 weeks.  Most of what we have seen thus far are deer and birds, but as you can see, a few more rare and shy critters have made appearances as well.   (more…)


Holiday Preparations

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In the wake of ‘giving festivities we now embark on preparations for the rest of the holiday season.  Lights are being strung, the scent of pine sap hangs in the air, and the world seems aglow with warmth from ovens and fireplaces alike as Winter finally arrives at the ranch.  (more…)


Tasting through Tuscany, Bandol, Côte-Rôtie, and Paso Robles

Tasting - Halter Ranch Vineyard

A line up of 1.5 Liter friends

 

This past week we had the opportunity to take a tasting journey through 6 delicious and distinct wines from around the world.  The first third of the tasting included 2 wines from France.  A 2010 Domaine Tempier from Bandol and a 2005 Levet “Chavaroche” Cote Rotie.  The middle third was a comparison between our 2011 Côtes de Paso and Denner’s 2011 Ditch Digger.  The final third included a 2004 Justin Isosceles and a 2010 Fontodi Flaccianello Sangiovese.

The Tempier, a Mourvedre based blend that exhibited a hint of Brettanomyaces on the nose and palate, offered lush spicy fruit just beneath the surface and these latter qualities became more apparent as the wine opened up.  The Côte-Rôtie is Syrah based and was distinctly spicy and earthy out of the bottle.  Some brambly red fruit began to arrive as more air arrived to open things up.  Tasting our Côtes side by side with Denner’s Ditch Digger was very interesting given the similarities between the two blends.  Both are composed predominantly of Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvedre, but the Côtes has a little Tannat in it and the Ditch Digger contains some Counoise and Cinsault.  Both blends were notably fruit forward but the Côtes seemed to lean more toward spicy red fruit while the Digger tended more toward the dark plummy end of the spectrum.  Judging from our own wines, the 2004 vintage was very warm and the ripeness of the 2004 Isosceles seemed to support this.  The wine was distinctly dark and viscous when compared with its compatriots up to this point.  Our final taste was the 2010 Sangiovese which was probably the staff favorite among the  larger format bottles at first taste (the Halter Ranch and Denner tastes were from more standard 750 ml sized bottles).  It was relatively fruit oriented compared to the Bandol and Côte-Rôtie while displaying enough acid and tannin to pair well with food and potentially cellar for 5-10 years more.

Expect similar posts as our staff tasting journeys continue.  As always, thanks for reading and cheers!

 

Tasting Room Glasses

The Tasting Room Team


This is the End…of Harvest 2013

On the night pick - End

 

The time has come to don our raincoats, spread straw on our roadways, and batten down the hatches for winter.  Another picking season has just passed and with the first rain we feel the slight sting of a hard earned harvest complete in concert with vast anticipation for the delicious wine that will result.  All sentiment aside, last Thursday night marked the final picking push as we near the end of Harvest 2013.  We currently have six stainless steel tanks filled with Cabernet Sauvignon undergoing primary fermentation.  All red Rhone varieties are now in barrel. Overall we brought in 460 tons of fruit from the ranch this year, selling 60 to other producers and keeping 400 tons to take through fermentation ourselves.  As a vintage 2013 looks absolutely stellar.  We were able to take all 17 varieties under cultivation to ideal ripeness without any significant rainfall or other grape-threatening weather. Keep an eye here for additional updates as we near the end of fermentation and move on to barrel ageing.

In the meantime check the rest of the post for a series of photos from this year’s pick.

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Tasting with Carnivores

Carnivore - Red Dragon

Dionaea – The Venus Fly Trap

 

For the past few weeks we’ve been experimenting with a Carnivorous Garden in the Halter Ranch Tasting room.  Dedicated readers may recall our fruit fly post from around this time last year.  For this harvest season we’ve taken mitigation efforts to a new level by incorporating some carnivorous flora in our multi-pronged fruit fly deterrent effort.  (more…)


Fitcation at Halter Ranch

Fitcation - Halter Ranch Vineyard

The Fitcation Crew and Ancestor

 

Fitcation is a retreat founded by a network of food and lifestyle bloggers who gather once a year to promote health, explore, and share ideas.  Check out the website here.  This past Friday we had the absolute pleasure of hosting the group toward the end of the first day on their 2013 Fitcation weekend.  They arrived around 3 pm for a tour of our vineyard and winery before meeting in the barn for dinner, provided by Trumpet Vine Catering,  and a presentation by Earth Shoe Company. Kris Beal, director of the SIP (Sustainability In Practice) Program, helped sponsor and organize this visit

The vineyard tour peaked with a visit to the Ancestor Oak and we stopped to soak up the shade. While sitting in the embrace of this ancient guardian the group wandered into a discussion about what the SIP program means and how it is incorporated into our vineyard and business practice here at Halter Ranch.  Though we’ve already discussed SIP on the blog, the Fitcation discussion opened up new questions and lines of thought that we’d like to touch upon here.

Very briefly, SIP certification is distinct from other third party certifications (like USDA Organic or Biodynamic) in that it requires a rigorous set of sustainable practices with regard to employee benefits, continuing education, and business plan, in addition to farming practices in the vineyard.  While sitting and talking under the tree we touched upon the concept of greenwashing.  A brief definition of this practice is: the use of any term or group of terms making an environmental claim about a product, in the interest of selling said product, without any basis in actual practice. Or as Kris and Leslie put it…without any teeth.  A glaring example of greenwashing in the food and beverage industry is the term ‘natural’ (also ‘naturally’).  There is no regulation of this term from the standpoint of the USDA or any other agency when it comes to food products.  As a result it has been appropriated and widely used on food packaging to encourage–essentially to take advantage of–consumers who are interested in buying products composed of ‘natural’ ingredients.  The result is that without definition and subsequent regulation, the term ‘natural’ is used so widely as to be essentially meaningless when it comes to telling us anything about how food and beverages are produced.

It is through the rigor of programs such as SIP that we may rely on the practices behind a product and its subsequent quality.  It was refreshing to participate in this discussion with a group of open minded folks who are both eager to engage with quality products and healthy living and to share the knowledge gained through that engagement.  A resounding thanks to our Fitcation guests for great discussion and an absolutely delightful afternoon.  Check out the Fitcation Blog here

 

 


Ancestor Dinner 2013

Halter Ranch Vineyard

2011 Ancestor Estate Reserve

 

Each October we choose one evening to pause harvest and dress up the old Smith family barn for the Ancestor Release Dinner.  This past Saturday marked the presentation of the 2011 vintage with a delectible coursed meal provided by Lido.  We have made the Ancestor Estate Reserve each year since 2003 and it typically is composed of our most concentrated and expressive red lots.  The 2011 blend is 49% Cabernet Sauvignon, 45% Petit Verdot, 6% Malbec.  It spent 14 months in French Oak.  60% of the barrels were new and 40% had been used to age wine at least once previously.

As a vintage, 2011 is particularly exciting as it marks the first year we made wine in our new gravity fed winery with Kevin at the helm.  Due to cool weather throughout summer 2011, we made only 324 cases of this absolutely delicious wine.  As a result, it is available only to Wine Club Members at this time.

What follows is a photographic journey through the appetizers, courses, and wine at this year’s Ancestor Dinner.

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Night Picking – A Journal in Photos

Picking - Halter Ranch Vineyard

Cool Grapes

 

This is just a taste of the awesome activities we partake in late at night during harvest season.  Welcome to the latest update on our staff vineyard project.  The three teams–New Kids on Block 3, Oscar’s Grouches, 21 and Holding–have all successfully harvested their respective vineyard blocks as of this morning. (more…)


Fermenting in Barrel

 

Halter Ranch Vineyard

Arnaud guides Block 8 Syrah berries into new French oak.

 

Since the 2011 vintage a portion of Syrah and Grenache have been sorted and crushed directly into French Oak barrels, some new (which means freshly toasted and constructed from the cooper, as yet untouched by wine), some neutral (neutral means that the barrel has had wine in it over the course of at least one year–this is our definition, some winemakers distinguish between barrels that have been used just once and those that have been used 2 or more times).  These special Rhone lots go through both primary (yeast eating sugar to create alcohol) and secondary (acetobacter eat malic acid-the variety of acid that comes from fruit-to create lactic acid-the type of acid associated with dairy, red wine, and some white wines) fermentation in barrel. (more…)

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